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Maestro John Eliot Gardiner returns to the Teatro del Maggio for an ‘unscheduled’ concert

Maestro John Eliot Gardiner returns to the Teatro del Maggio for an ‘unscheduled’ concert which will be recorded on Tuesday 9 March 2021 and subsequently broadcast in streaming.
On the program the Symphony No. 2 in C minor op. 17, Little Russia by Pëtr Il’ič Čajkovskij and the  Enigma variations by Edward Elgar.

In the meantime, Maggio announces that the concert conducted by maestro Zubin Mehta with Rudolf Buchbinder – recorded last March 6 – will be streamed on the Theater website, Wednesday 10 March at 8 pm.

Florence, 8 March 2021 – After his debut on the podium of the Maggio last September 2020, Maestro John Eliot Gardiner returns to conduct the Orchestra of the Maggio Musicale Fiorentino in an ‘unscheduled’ concert which will be recorded on Tuesday 9 March 2021 and which will subsequently broadcast in streaming. On the program the Symphony No. 2 in C minor op. 17, Little Russia by Pëtr Il’ič Čajkovskij and the Enigma variations by Edward Elgar.

The Maggio informs the public that the concert conducted by maestro Zubin Mehta with Rudolf Buchbinder – recorded last March 6 – will be streamed on the Theater website, Wednesday 10 March at 8 pm.

Two more symphonic concert recordings are scheduled for March – which will be broadcast later – on March 21 the concert conducted by Manfred Honeck, and on March 27 the concert conducted by Zubin Mehta with violinist Vilde Frang. Finally, on March 28, the opera Cosi fan tutte by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart will be recorded, conducted by Zubin Mehta in the new staging under the direction of Sven-Erich Bechtolf, in rehearsal in recent weeks.

At the opening of the concert there’s the Čajkovskij’s Little Russia: title of his Second Symphony in C minor Op. 17. The name refers not only to the name used to indicate Ukraine, where the composer regularly went to visit his sister Alexandra and her seven grandchildren, but also (under the suggestion of his friend Nikolai Kaškin) to the presence of various popular themes of that area. Among all, “The crane” emerges in the triumphal fanfare of the symphony finale. There is, however, that sense of nostalgia and loneliness present in much of Čajkovskij’s repertoire thanks to the constant presence of a heartfelt melody of the horn. From Čajkovskij’s land we move on to England for the Enigma variations by Edward Elgar, a piece that soon became the major symphonic composition of the British scene of the late nineteenth century. Its success did not derive only from the refined writing, but also from the mystery that revolves around both the letters of the fourteen variations of the main theme (characterized by the initials of a name or the nickname of a person dear to the composer) up to the secondary theme which, according to the author, it runs through the entire composition without being played in its entirety (the most illustrious exponents of British musicology indulged in the most reckless musical identikits, recognizing, among the various sources, even the famous hymn “God save the Queen”) .

The program of the hall is available free of charge on the website of the Theater at the page dedicated to the concert.
The overall duration is approximately one hour and fifteen minutes.